unnamed

Was a day
great sound from the sky
made us shake
then we found a word
that brought it to us
and we did not shake.

Was a day
strange flying beast
darted brittle past us
and we were afraid
then we found a word
that brought it to us
and we did not shake.

Was a day
sharp sounds
and screams echoed
and we were afraid
and there is no word
to stop the shaking.

Thunder and dragonfly
are mighty and amazing;
fingers squeezing triggers
in our schools —
there is no word
to stop the shaking.

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About riverwriter

Poet, playwright, duplicate bridge player, website designer, cottager, husband, father, grandfather, former athlete, carpenter, computer helper for my friends, theatre designer, backstage polymath, retired teacher of highschool English, drama, art, a baritone singer in a barbershop quartet, who knows what else? wordcurrents is on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wordcurrents/ Doug also has a Facebook page, "Incognitio", related to his novels.
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3 Responses to unnamed

  1. Rosemarie Collins says:

    Beautifully poignant… Your poem evokes great sadness as it cries for an end to this madness.

    • riverwriter says:

      Thank you, Rosemarie. I was wondering if readers would actually read to the end of this, as the beginning is very primitive.

      The idea came out of a discussion at a book launch last evening: Carol Weekes was launching her new horror novel, “Walter’s Crossing” (which is about bullying and its consequences); and the group discussion turned to what is horrifying. I came up with the phrase “the unnamed” — that stopped the discussion for a moment. As I think about it now, maybe I should have said “the unnameable”.

      When I arrived home, I still had to write that day’s poem, and chose “unnamed” as the title; but as you can see, it took me elsewhere. That is one of the joys of writing: you never know where you will end up.

      • Rosemarie Collins says:

        The original title suits the poem, I think. Your coined ‘the unnameable’ is also appropriate, but I still prefer ‘unnamed’ since there is no word to describe what happened.

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